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Chris Blackburn

Chris Blackburn

With over 26 years of experience in technology, Chris has spent the last 20 years in consulting with a core focus in the Microsoft space. Having an enthusiasm and love for all things Microsoft, Chris has worked in helping organizations and governments with systems and device management through Endpoint Manager on-premises (formerly Configuration Manager) and in the Cloud (formerly Intune). He also brings unique approach on both architecting and implementing Collaboration tools like Microsoft Exchange, legacy Lync and Skype for Business, SharePoint, Teams. Bringing this experience to the modern day, Chris has been on the cutting edge of the Cloud, working with Office 365, Azure, along cloud-first Identity, Security & Compliance, and Endpoint Management thru architecting & deploying solutions in the enterprise space. With over 30+ Microsoft exams under his belt, frequent blogging on the Microsoft 365, along with writing material and training for Microsoft exams and speaking engagements, his breath in the Microsoft space goes beyond supporting and maintaining complex Microsoft environments.

Contributions by Chris Blackburn

What Flavor of Defender Would You Like?

Chris Blackburn walks you through a savory journey into the Defender for Endpoint story across both the Microsoft 365 and Azure platforms. Enjoy the main meal of the deployment story on all platforms (whether its workstation, server & mobile) and operating systems (Linux, Mac, Windows, iOS, Android), and close out with the sweets of operationalizing these tools in your security program.

Chris Blackburn by Chris Blackburn

Approaching Security Projects After Prior Efforts Failed

Sometimes in our work with clients we assist with security projects that occur subsequent to one or more failures in prior efforts to achieve security improvements. In these situations, we are usually able to quickly identify the reasons why past efforts failed and plan a new project that we know—based on many experiences elsewhere—will succeed. Sometimes the new project uses the same technology as the failed project. Sometimes we suggest an entirely different approach.
 

Chris Blackburn by Chris Blackburn