Expert Insights

blog

SQL Server


Comparing Extended Events in SQL Server and Azure SQL Database

An exciting new feature of Azure SQL Database is the implementation of Extended Events (XEvents). I use XEvents in SQL Server to track information about many things – query performance, deadlocks, Availability Group status, and more. Until October, they were missing from SQL Database, but they are now in preview!

Jake Borzym by Jake Borzym

What’s New for SQL Server in Azure – December 2015

For months, http://portal.azure.com was in preview mode. I’ve watched the new “blades” develop over time, with changes to the functionality. On December 2, Microsoft announced the Azure Portal was in General Availability status.

Jake Borzym by Jake Borzym

Schedule Extended Events Session Start or Stop

When creating an Extended Events session, you may want to start it at a later time, or stop it at a specific time. This ability isn't built into the CREATE SESSION statement, but it can easily be accomplished by using ALTER SESSION and SQL Server Agent.

Jake Borzym by Jake Borzym

Microsoft BI Announcements from SQL PASS Summit 2015

SQL PASS started off with a bang following the Keynote. There was new type of session introduced this year called the “Foundation Sessions”. The first of these session types presented was for BI and was led by James Phillips, Microsoft’s CVP of BI (and now more).

Seth Bauer by Seth Bauer

Rights Required for Creating Extended Events Sessions

What rights are required in SQL Server to create and view an Extended Events session?

In SQL Server 2008 and 2008R2, a user had to be granted CONTROL SERVER to create and run sessions. CONTROL SERVER is roughly equivalent to sysadmin. The difference is that if you grant someone CONTROL SERVER and you don’t want them to access something, you can issue an explicit DENY. Having to do that for a large number of objects would be a pain, though.

Concurrency Blog by Concurrency Blog